The Coronavirus Surprised the Prepping Industry-Here’s How!

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The coronavirus said, “Peek-a-boo,” and the preppers replied, “I didn’t see you.”

Hours after the announcement of a possible pandemic back in December, the e-commerce boomed as some people had suddenly realized they were wrong.

Yes.

I’m talking about us. You, me, and everybody else who made fun of the preppers all the way until the pandemic struck. In the recent past, they were politicized, called out as selfish and distrustful, and, more often than not, bullied for their “weird” habit of preparing for a rainy day.

But really, what has happened following the coronavirus outbreak in December in the prepping and the non-prepping industry has been a mess, has been a beauty.

We’ll cruise around the island and behold this panic North America has gone through.

Even the preppers hadn’t prepped – the irony

Surprising as it may sound, the preppers were taken aback as well when the coronavirus broke out instead of the doomsday they’ve too dearly anticipated.

 

But were they in the same misery as the non-preppers? As evident it is, they weren’t. After all, coronavirus wasn’t really much different from doomsday: can’t go out; can’t meet others; can’t trust people; everybody’s needy and whatnot.

Prepping industry engulfed by coronavirus

Then how can I say the preppers hadn’t prepped in this COVID-19 bingo?

 

To put simply: the preppers had stockpiled the bug-out bags that weren’t coronavirus preventive. Take the N-95 masks and hand sanitizers, for example, which weren’t available in most emergency survival kits the preppers had stored.

 

And that’s justified too. I mean, who’d want a hand sanitizer for a doomsday?

 

Now in the rare kits where they existed, their manufacturers were immediately termed as being “unsuitable” for the pandemic, medically. Now the quarantine was beginning, and the master preppers were themselves in bad shape—most, if not all.

 

Enter: the e-commerce boom.

 

Restricting movement meant it was time for people to turn to online services—which they did. A study shows that the top 2000 North American e-commerce sites each jumped about 125% in sales. That’s more than doubled.

 

The top stores soon ran out of the stock, and still are out of stock as the demand toppled the supply.

 

The preppers and non-preppers alike bought huge wonders; packs of hand sanitizers, masks, toilet paper, bug-out bags, and pretty much everything on a coronavirus prevention emergency checklist.

 

This was a HUGE bruh-moment too.

 

The non-prepping bullies ran into the preppers. They were seen hoarding their carts with the top coronavirus survival commodities, along with non-perishable food supplies.

 

A proud moment for the preppers, whose fear turned out correct. A shameful one for non-preppers, whose silence proved it all.

Forgive me, father, for I have sinned – the tragedy

It was a shame that I myself felt as well when I bumped into my neighbor in a store.

 

Time for a little story, I guess.

 

Not all preppers were unprepped.

 

Javi is not really sociable, and to me, he’s always apparently been that insecure lad we feel awkward running into. Plus, he hardly speaks English, so for me, he’s always been a no-go.

 

But this pandemic truly showed me who he is. I bumped into him during the quarantine at the local 7-Eleven. He was dolled up in the coronavirus preventive wear, as I wore a home-made makeshift mask made out of my old jeans and looked for any clinical mask, I could lay my hands on.

 

We didn’t say anything, but we both knew. I was nervous; he was confident. He bought a pack of batteries and stuffed it into his backpack.

 

You’re wondering did I find the mask, right? Nope.

 

I asked Javi for a few. He gave me a dozen.

 

The purpose is to refute the everyday useless debate the conservatives put up for the preppers: you’re distrusting and promoting distrust on the public system and government.

 

Well, why won’t they? After all, the pandemic has shown how poorly the government managed the outbreak. The stores clearly ran out of all the PPEs and related equipment, and the volunteers and preppers carried out most of the social work.

 

Where is UNNECESSARY distrust, exactly?

The Good Sirs and Madams – the joy

Like I said before, the prepping industry is often called out as selfish.

 

But do you know that the internet search for “preppers near me” multiplied overnight when the non-preppers learned that the e-commerce and local stores alike were out of stock?

 

They said, “the best revenge is to be unlike them,” and amen, the preppers said.

 

There was a massive number of first responders to this cry from the public. The preppers stepped in like the Power Rangers and made sure that the old and vulnerable ones in their local neighborhoods had all they needed to survive.

 

At places, many even stepped forward to give them a 24/7 service to entertain their medical needs. Purely heroic, beautifully exemplary.

 

But the fact that most preppers hide their prepperism is what pains me. The fear of being educated to stay cautious is sad. Still, having a big heart in the times of need isn’t easy. This clearly wipes out all the tags of “selfishness” from the preppers and relabels them as “heroes.”

 

Apparently, yes, many people have learned a lesson, including me, but is this lesson here to stay?

We’ll never learn – the comedy

The laugh is always mine.

 

Who says it was the first and last time it’d happened? Sure, yeah, there are differences in technology every few years, but remember the swine flu pandemic back in 2009? Similar things followed, but we always end up forgetting the lessons we learn.

 

Prepping is something that must be taught in schools, contrary to what the conservative political thought has to say about this. If you remove the term “prepping,” it’s plainly a precaution that every walking human must take to minimize natural calamities and survive, let alone prevent them.

 

But … will the history really repeat itself?

 

That remains to be seen…!